Publications

 


1. Giannini was a populist politician who knew how to use new media to reach a broad and new public. We think populism is important today, both as a contemporary political movement to study, and as a movement with historical roots we can explore and explain.

For roughly a century, Sarah Bernhardt's centrality to modernism­ has been largely ignored. Her inspiration and patronage of the twirling, tendrilic forms of Art Nouveau­ is often discussed in relation to her capacity for self-promotion and commercialization rather than as evidence of a pioneering performance style that subsequently helped drive...

I authored this special issue on 'The Actress-Manager and Silent Film', with Vito Adriaensens (Columbia University) because I was tired of seeing actresses discussed as 'only' actresses, or stars, or women who looked good but were not (it is implied) working as strategic business women.

What is lost and gained in the shift from physical to digital archiving? What and how do archives preserve, and how do they curate public access? How do we search for digital material? Which tools are used to modify and limit our search options, and what does this tell us about digital networks and our relationships to them? Who...

"Duckett's excellent skills as a researcher and a writer shine through. . . . Seeing Sarah Bernhardt therefore not only adds much needed context and analysis to the performances of the legendary Bernhardt, but it also shows the promise of intermedial research."--Theatre Journal

In my article for Film Literature Quarterly, I compare Stanley Kubrick's Lolita (1962) to Vladimir Nabokov's original 1955 novel. I argue that the film is not a weak copy of a famous novel but introduces Lolita through its own palimpsest of virtuoso parodic turns. I believe, therefore, that there is a conscious and clever humor in the way that ...

In my article "The Stars Might Be Smiling: A Feminist Forage into a Famous Film" (published in Fantastic Voyages of the Cinematic Imagination : Georges Méliès's Trip to the Moon, ed. Matthew Solomon, SUNY, 2011), I argue that the humor of Méliès's A Trip to the Moon derives from the gendered comedy that his images set into play.